Affective reactivity

In our lab, we are vividly concerned about how emotion emerge. We are interested in the situational conditions, cognitive appraisal, and individual differences that make people react differently. We comprehensively measure emotion responses at the experiential, expressive and physiological level and investigate what are their determinants.

Self-esteem and affective reactivity

Self-esteem, i.e., the extent to which we value ourselves, has been also recognized as being a trait involved in emotional intelligence. Past studies have shown that different degree of self-esteem may induce different way we regulate emotion. In this project, we take a step back and question whether self-esteem differences may induce different type of engagement in emotionally loaded situations. We are particularly interested in the mediation of particular cognitive evaluation of the situation, that could come into play to trigger these potential differences.

CARLA Collaborators:
Elise Dan-Glauser
Simon Thuillard

 

Yoga practice and affective reactivity

Yoga practice is supposed to enhance wellbeing and counteract psychopathology through superior emotion reactivity and regulation strategies. Yet, given the knowledge from yogic wisdom, we can also reason that emotional responses are less pronounced with longer and more frequent practice. With this project, we aim to disentangle this issue and highlight the specific effect of yoga practice (determined for example by its duration and frequency) on emotional reactivity. Our major goal is to identify stable and substantial changes yoga practitioners encounter in the way they engage in emotional situation and react to them.

CARLA Collaborators:
Elise Dan-Glauser
Christine Mohr
Simon Thuillard

Humor and emotion

We are particularly interested on humor appreciation and the role of appraisal in finding a stimuli funny or not. Our project plans to test several types of humorous stimuli corresponding to different kind of humor theories: the incongruity theory, corresponding to a cognitive point of view, and the superiority theory, corresponding to a more social point of view. Using psychophysiological measures, we would also like to assess the possible usefulness of humor as an emotion regulation strategy.

CARLA Collaborators:
Elise Dan-Glauser
Simon Thuillard

Construction of a moral battery for evaluating moral emotions

We are currently collaborating on a project about moral emotions led by Dr. Alfonso Gutiérrez-Zotes, clinical psychologist at the Hospital Universitari Institut Pere Mata, IISPV, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, CIBERSAM, Reus, Spain. With the help of the Geneva Emotion Picture Database (GAPED, Dan-Glauser & Scherer, 2011), we work at better understanding moral emotions, such as shame and guilt. We notably investigate the perception and evaluation of these emotions in various populations, including patients with Borderline Personality Disorders.

CARLA Collaborators:
Elise Dan-Glauser

External collaborators:
Alfonso Gutiérrez-Zotes

GĂ©opolis - CH-1015 Lausanne
Switzerland
Tel. +41 21 692 35 25