Ecospat in the medias


 

Feb 6 - Nature Today - Mammals and birds could have best shot at surviving climate change

Mammals and birds, warm-blooded animals, may survive rapid climate change. But it could be tougher for cold-blooded reptiles and amphibians, who could be too slow to adapt, according to new research. link

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Feb 3 - Mother Jones - Study: Mammals May Be Better Equipped to Adapt to Climate Change

The story of the tortoise and the hare teaches us that slow and steady wins the race. But when it comes to adapting to changing environmental conditions, Aesop (the ancient Greek storyteller credited with the fable) isn’t quite on the money. A study released last week shows that mammals and birds are faster to adapt and better equipped to deal with changes in temperatures than reptiles and amphibians. link

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Jan 30 - Scientific American - Warming Threatens Reptiles More Than Birds and Mammals

Over planetary history, warm-blood animals have outperformed cold-blooded animals in adapting to changing temperatures. link

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Jan 29 - France24 - Mammals more likely to survive climate change: study

An analysis of how nearly 11,5000 species fared over 270 million years of hot-and-cold fluctuations showed that warm-blooded creatures cope better with change than reptiles and amphibians, a team reported in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution. link

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Jan 29 - Nature Ecology & Evolution, News & Views by Algar & Tarr - Fossils, phylogenies and the evolving climate niche

A dataset that links geographical occurrences, phylogenies, fossils and climate reconstructions for more than 10,000 vertebrate species reveals accelerated rates of climate niche evolution in warm-blooded animals. link

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Jan 29 - Boston Globe - Mammals, birds could beat reptiles and amphibians in race to survive, study suggests

Mammals and birds, warm-blooded animals, may survive rapid climate change. But it could be tougher for cold-blooded reptiles and amphibians, who could be too slow to adapt, according to new research. link

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Jan 29 - France24 - Mammals more likely to survive climate change: study

An analysis of how nearly 11,5000 species fared over 270 million years of hot-and-cold fluctuations showed that warm-blooded creatures cope better with change than reptiles and amphibians, a team reported in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution. link

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Jan 29 - Science Daily - Mammals and birds could have best shot at surviving climate change

New research that analyzed more than 270 million years of data on animals shows that mammals and birds -- both warm-blooded animals - may have a better chance of evolving and adapting to the Earth's rapidly changing climate than their cold-blooded peers, reptiles and amphibians. link

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Nov 3 - EU Research journal, Winter 2017 p. 33-35 - A deeper picture of biological communities.

Many different factors affect the distribution of plants, insects and other species in the natural world, including not only their environmental requirements, but also thir interactions with other species. The SESAMP'ALP project aims to develop improved methods of modelling biological communities, as Prof. Antoine Guisan explains. pdflink on EU Research website

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12 septembre - RTS La 1ère, émission CQFD - Une rencontre biologique entre science et art à voir à Renens

"Big data, rencontre biologique entre science et art" est une exposition à voir à l’espace culturel de la Ferme des Tilleuls, à Renens. Son but: rendre lisible, visible et beau des données informatiques et donner du sens aux big data par l’intermédiaire de tableaux artistiques. Sarah Dirren vous offre une visite en compagnie de Kirell Benzi, docteur de l'Ecole polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) et auteur de ces œuvres. Invité: l'écologue Antoine Guisan, spécialiste en modélisation des écosystèmes alpins et fournisseurs de données pour les tableaux de Kirell Benzi. lien sur le site web CQFD

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