2016

Online newspaper comments as a new emergent genre | Beyond word: the semiotic ideologies of sexting | La communication des politiques à l'épreuve d'internet | “Everywhere I go, you’re going with me”: Time and space deixis as affective positioning resources in shared moments of digital mourning | Sharing leaks as breaking news stories on Twitter: the case of leaking the “Moscovici draft” | #JeSuisCharlie?: hashtags as narrative stance-taking resources in contexts of ecstatic sharing
 

Online newspaper comments as a new emergent genre

Le vendredi 9 décembre 2016, 10h15-12h00, Anthropole, salle 3059

Entrée libre, conférence de Martin Luginbühl, Université de Bâle.

Online newspaper comments as a new emergent genre
Printed newspaper texts and their online equivalents are - at the very first sight - the same. But as their different medialities (Jäger 2015) come along with remediation (Bolter/Grusin 1999) and different affordances (Gibson 1977, Zipoli Caiani 2014), online newspaper genres are hybrids of old and new aspects (Heyd 2016). They have - compared to the printed versions - different layouts, segmentations, contexts and sometimes even different purposes. Therefore they have to be characterized as ‘bridging’ (Herring et al. 2005) or ‘adapted’ (Crowston/Williams 2000) genres.

These genres can also be characterized by new possible actions that can be performed by the reader (from liking to sharing and commenting) - and new ways of exploiting these possibilities. My talk will focus on the question which kind of actions readers can perform and how they exploit them in the case of online newspaper comments and what consequences can be observed with regard to public and privat spheres (Toepfl/Piwoni 2015, Lander/Jucker 2011) .

Conférence présentée dans le cadre du séminaire de Marcel Burger “Langage en Action: nouveaux medias, réseaux sociaux, identités numériques et citoyenneté”.

 

Beyond word: the semiotic ideologies of sexting

Le vendredi 25 novembre 2016, 10h15-12h00, Anthropole, salle 3059

Entrée libre, conférence de Crispin Thurlow, Université de Berne.

Beyond word: the semiotic ideologies of sexting
Like so many new media, digital photography has opened up whole new opportunities for people to create and organize their own bodily representations, just as cell phones have allowed us to take these projects into just about every nook and cranny of our lives. However, while digital technologies afford people a distinctive opportunity to experience their own and others’ bodies in different ways, these technologies also open up possibilities for other people to regulate, control and abuse their bodies in different ways. Nowhere, I think, do we see this tension between freedom and control more clearly than in sexting.

Rather than looking at what people are actually doing in/with their sexts, my presentation focuses on the ways sexting is taken up as a topic of public discussion. Much of what we come to know about sexting is not so much what we are doing ourselves, but what we have been told others are (supposedly) doing. On this basis, my goal with this presentation is to demonstrate how public discourse about sexting is entangled in some all too familiar language ideologies; and the way people talk about sexting tells us as much about their attitudes (and prejudices) towards certain kinds of people, certain kinds of sexuality, as it does about communication and/or technology. More than this, however, I also want to show how sexting is caught up also with a number of closely related media ideologies and, indeed, some deep-seated semiotic ideologies.

Conférence présentée dans le cadre du séminaire de Marcel Burger “Langage en Action: nouveaux medias, réseaux sociaux, identités numériques et citoyenneté”.

La communication des politiques à l'épreuve d'internet

Le vendredi 4 novembre 2016, 10h15-12h00, Anthropole, salle 3059

Entrée libre, conférence de Jamil Dakhlia, Université Sorbonne Nouvelle, Paris.

La communication des politiques à l'épreuve d'internet
À travers l’étude des genres discursifs et des stratégies argumentatives de légitimité, crédibilité ou autorité privilégiés dans le discours politique en ligne, il s’agira d’identifier ce qu’Internet, et les réseaux sociaux notamment, en tant que vecteur de construction identitaire et de démocratisation de la parole politique peuvent changer au discours des candidats et des élus. L’enjeu est donc de déterminer en quoi leurs propriétés technolangagières prolongent ou renouvellent des fonctions traditionnelles de la communication politique.

On s’attachera en particulier à vérifier comment l’identité discursive des leaders sur la Toile conjugue les exigences d’une communication d’intérêt général avec l’impératif d’une expression de soi dans des dispositifs supposés, compte tenu d’affordances spécifiques, brouiller les frontières entre intimité, vie privée et vie publique.

Conférence présentée dans le cadre du séminaire de Marcel Burger “Langage en Action: nouveaux medias, réseaux sociaux, identités numériques et citoyenneté”.

“Everywhere I go, you’re going with me”: Time and space deixis as affective positioning resources in shared moments of digital mourning

Le vendredi 14 octobre 2016, 10h15-12h00, Anthropole, salle 3059

Entrée libre, conférence de Korina Giaxoglou, The Open University, Londres

“Everywhere I go, you’re going with me”: Time and space deixis as affective positioning resources in shared moments of digital mourning

This talk presents findings from an empirical study of sharing practices on a Facebook memorial site and draws attention to the uses of time and space deixis as affective positioning resources. Using Androutsopoulos׳s (2014) framework for the empirical analysis of sharing online, I examine practices of selecting, styling, and negotiating in significant moments of mourning online, focusing on the entextualizations of a female user shared over the course of a six-month period. The analysis shows how sharers mobilize discursive resources to construct their multifaceted identities as mourners in the local context of the memorial site as well as in the wider situational context of public mourning online. In addition, findings indicate how sharers use time and space deixis to construe spatiotemporal framings and position themselves interactionally and affectively to the dead, the networked mourners, and their digitally entextualized mutable self. It is argued that shifts from static to dynamic construals of time (‘tonight’ vs. ‘everynight’) and space (‘up there’ vs. ‘everywhere’) are linked to shifts from positions of relative disempowerment to positions of empowerment and agency for the sharer in the context of public mourning. This talk aims at offering insights relevant to the study of public mourning in relation to digital performances of self and it contributes to the empirical study of time and space deixis in discourse and participation online

References: Androutsopoulos, J. 2014, Moments of Sharing: Entextualization and linguistic repertoires in social networking, Journal of Pragmatics 73, 4-18.

Conférence présentée dans le cadre du séminaire de Marcel Burger “Langage en Action: nouveaux medias, réseaux sociaux, identités numériques et citoyenneté”.

Sharing leaks as breaking news stories on Twitter: the case of leaking the “Moscovici draft”

Le mercredi 12 octobre 2016, 13h15-15h00, Anthropole, salle Internef 233

Entrée libre, conférence de Korina Giaxoglou, The Open University, Londres

Sharing leaks as breaking news stories on Twitter: the case of leaking the “Moscovici draft”
Sharing a leak as a breaking news story is a special type of news storytelling which involves revealing information that can illuminate an issue of public interest. This article provides an empirical investigation of sharing leaks as breaking news, focusing on the case of the leak of a Eurogroup draft statement also known as the “Moscovici draft”. The document was allegedly authored by the European Commissioner, Pierre Moscovici, in advance of the Eurogroup meeting of the 16th of February 2015 and became the site of heated contention after the end of that day’s inconclusive meeting, at the climax of the Greek bailout negotiations. It was leaked via Facebook, Twitter, and Scribd by Paul Mason, former Channel 4 Economics editor and Newsnight presenter, and became widely shared online and in mainstream media.

Drawing on insights from the study of digital sharing (Androutsopoulos, 2014) the article shows how the leaked document is shared as “breaking news”, bringing the backstage to the frontstage (Goffman, 1959) and providing networked publics with a sense of affective participation in the unfolding of behind-the-scenes happenings. The study also examines how the leak is shaped as a breaking news story, building on literature on narrativity (van Dijk, 1998, Georgakopoulou, 2015, Dayter, 2015). Its main finding is that narrativity in this type of breaking news story is based on cumulativeness, recursivity, and transmediality. Narrative organisation is based on the categories of the Breaking Headline and Lead Story, which can be complemented by the categories of Reorientation and Comments, indicating a blending of “traditional” news story formats and live broadcasting strategies. The article calls for closer attention to the study of ‘small’ moments in specific local sites of engagement and towards more precise, empirical understandings of modes of news storytelling online and public participation.

Conférence présentée dans le cadre du séminaire de Marcel Burger “La construction des identités en communication publique”.

#JeSuisCharlie?: hashtags as narrative stance-taking resources in contexts of ecstatic sharing

Le mercredi 16 mars 2016, 13h15-15h00, Anthropole, salle 5081

Entrée libre, conférence de Korina Giaxoglou, The Open University (GB)

#JeSuisCharlie?: hashtags as narrative stance-taking resources in contexts of ecstatic sharing
The use of hashtags as storytelling devices through which events and their interpretations are framed have received little attention so far in the field of sociolinguistics and discourse analysis. This paper seeks to fill this gap by providing a narrative discourse perspective to hashtags as resources for sharing significant events and moments that afford users opportunities for engaging actively in story making and stance taking. 

The data for analysis are drawn from mediated contexts of ecstatic sharing of the tragic events in the wake of the attacks at the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo offices on the 7th January 2015, making up a corpus of feed and wall events on Twitter and Facebook that covers a period of four months. The analysis examines trajectories of the hasthag #JeSuisCharlie and its instantiations in the English language #IamCharlie as well as its variations #JeneSuispasCharlie/#IamnotCharlie.

I discuss how such identity statements are being re-entextualised for multilingual audiences and re-circulated by and for affective publics in ways that lead to the emblematization of identities and conflicting vernacular stances to global events. This paper presents a situated understanding of hashtags as cross-linguistic resources of mediated story making in contexts of ecstatic sharing that arguably leads to new modes of witnessing in public mediations of global events.

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